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CedarWorks Photo Blog

Camden at Sunrise

Posted on April 18th by Doug

This is Camden Harbor, the next harbor down from Rockport, the town CedarWorks calls home. This was taken after scrambling up the front of Mt. Batty in the dark (with a headlamp) and then waiting for the sun to start to make it’s appearance. The view from Mt. Batty is spectacular. You may recognize these lines by the poet Edna St. Vincent Millay (who was born in neighboring Rockland, Maine and made her home in Camden for many years) as the first few lines of her poem “Renascence”:

All I could see from where I stood
Was three long mountains and a wood;
I turned and looked another way,
And saw three islands in a bay.
So with my eyes I traced the line
Of the horizon, thin and fine,
Straight around till I was come
Back to where I’d started from;
And all I saw from where I stood
Was three long mountains and a wood.

You can still see that view today exactly as she described it 100 years ago.

Posted in Maine   |   Photography by Doug Felton


Overlooking Megunticook Lake

Posted on April 18th by Doug

This beautiful view is 15 minutes away from our office in Rockport, Maine and is taken from a spot known as Maiden’s Cliff. Hiking the Camden Hills and surrounding hills and mountains is just one of the great things about living and working here… and it just never gets old. On the day this photo was taken, there was no one else up there and so I took my time taking a series of photos, probably more than 30 in all, and then stitched them together in Photoshop to create this larger-than-life panorama. On the way back down, there were blueberries ripe for the picking and I may have helped myself to a few.

Posted in Maine   |   Photography by Doug Felton


Indian Island Lighthouse

Posted on April 18th by Doug

Indian Island Lighthouse is one a familiar site to anyone here in Rockport (the place CedarWorks calls home). Sean and I and a friend headed out for sail one gorgeous Saturday morning and, since the wind was almost non-existent, it gave us a great opportunity to take some photographs. We did a lot of rowing that day… even managed to break an oarlock… but no one was complaining. The shot below of Sean’s boat (under sail towards Indian Island again) was taken some time later after the oarlock was repaired. Just another gorgeous day in Maine.

Posted in Maine   |   Photography by Doug Felton (top photo), Sean Carnell (bottom photo)


Fake Miniature Frolic 16 Playset

Posted on April 18th by Doug

This is a photo of our Frolic 16 swing set, which we decided to have some fun with in Photoshop. By using either a tilt-shift lens, or faking it in Photoshop after the photo is taken, a photograph can be made to look like a miniature of a real-life object. It helps to be somewhat above and at a good distance from the subject, and in this case we had used a cherry-picker to get a nice, high vantage point of some of our sets… which turned out to be just perfect for simulating a tilt-shift effect. Look at the girl on the slide; you’d swear she was a little plastic person from a model train set, but in fact she’s the daughter of one of our Design Experts!

Here are a few interesting links if you’d like to learn more about tilt-shift photography:

Wikipedia entry on tilt-shift photography
Flickr Tilt-shift Miniature Fakes

Posted in Fun, Playsets & Swingsets   |   Photography by Sean Carnell


Our Home

Posted on April 18th by Doug

Nestled among the trees along the Midcoast of Maine, is the place CedarWorks calls home. Just yesterday during an afternoon stroll to stretch the legs, a blue heron swooped down low over the pond, dropping down unexpectedly from the trees. We’ve even seen a moose come out of the woods to swim in the pond on a hot summer day, and on a sunny day you’ll often see families walking across the lawn to the pond after the children have finished playing on our playsets in the front yard. Stop by and say hello if you’re in the neighborhood.

Posted in Maine   |   Photography by Doug Felton